Colorectal cancer screening is appropriate for some adults aged 76 to 85, US panel concludes | The BMJ

BMJ 2015;351:h5512

Adults who are at average risk of colorectal cancer and who do not have a family history of genetic disorders that increases their risk should be screened for the cancer from age 50 and continue until 75, say new draft recommendations.1

Released by the US Preventive Services Task Force on 6 October, the recommendations say that the decision to screen adults 76 or older should be made on an individual basis, on the basis of the patient’s prior history of screening and overall health.

Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer in the United States, causing 50 000 deaths a year, yet about a third of eligible adults in the US have never been screened. The cancer is most often diagnosed among adults aged 65 to 74 years, and the median age of death from it is 73 years.

The evidence that screening adults aged 50-75 reduces colorectal cancer mortality was “convincing,” the panel said, but it added that it had “found no head-to-head studies that demonstrated that any of the recommended screening strategies are more effective than others.”

Read the full article via Colorectal cancer screening is appropriate for some adults aged 76 to 85, US panel concludes | The BMJ.

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