Cancer Research: Skin cancer diagnoses rise by 45% in a decade

Cancer Research UK| July 2019 | Skin cancer rates rocket by 45% in 10 years 

Figures analysed by Cancer Research UK (CRUK) demonstrate that in the 10 years since 2004 skin cancer rates rose by  more than a third (35%) for women and by almost three-fifths (55%) for men.

The figures have been released to mark the launch of the charity’s Own Your Tone campaign which encourages people to embrace their natural skin tone and protect their skin from too much sun.

sun
Image source: cancerresearchuk.org

Melanoma skin cancer is the fifth most common cancer in the UK and the second most common cancer in people aged 25-49, but almost 90% of melanoma cases could be prevented if people took better care of their skin in the sun both at home and abroad. Getting sunburnt, just once every two years, can triple the risk of melanoma skin cancer.

Karis Betts, health information manager at Cancer Research UK, said: “Sun safety is not just for when you’re going abroad, the sun can be strong enough to burn in the UK from the start of April to the end of September, so it’s important that people are protecting themselves properly both at home and further afield when the sun is strong. We want to encourage people to embrace their natural look and protect their skin from UV damage by seeking shade, covering up and regularly applying sunscreen with at least SPF 15 and 4 or 5 stars.” (Source: Cancer Research UK)

Read the full press release from Cancer Research UK 

In the news:

Independent Cheap flights blamed as skin cancer rates soar by 45 per cent in a decade

BBC News Skin cancer risk ‘not just from holiday sun’

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