COVID-19 rapid guideline: delivery of radiotherapy NICE guideline

NICE |  March 2020 | COVID-19 rapid guideline: delivery of radiotherapy [NG162]

The purpose of this guideline is to maximise the safety of patients who need radiotherapy and make the best use of NHS resources, while protecting staff from infection. It will also enable services to match the capacity for radiotherapy to patient needs if services become limited because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

This guidance was first published on 28 March 2020.

NICE has also produced a COVID-19 rapid guideline on delivery of systemic anticancer treatments.

This guideline is for:

  • health and care practitioners
  • health and care staff involved in planning and delivering services
  • commissioners

The recommendations bring together

  • existing national and international guidance and policies
  • advice from specialists working in the NHS from across the UK. These include people with expertise and experience of treating patients for the specific health conditions covered by the guidance during the current COVID-19 pandemic.

Full details from NICE

Ovarian cancer disease profile

Disease profile in England: Incidence, mortality, stage and survival for ovary, fallopian tube and primary peritoneal carcinomas |  Public Health England

This report provides a detailed insight into the status of ovarian cancer in England.  It is the first report from the Cancer Audit Feasibility Pilot project which runs for two years and includes details of disease incidence, mortality and survival.

Amount and intensity of leisure-time physical activity and lower cancer risk

Matthews, C. E. et al. | Amount and Intensity of Leisure-Time Physical Activity and Lower Cancer Risk | Journal of Clinical Oncology | published online December 26th 2019.

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Purpose
To determine whether recommended amounts of leisure-time physical activity (ie, 7.5-15 metabolic equivalent task [MET] hours/week) are associated with lower cancer risk, describe the shape of the dose-response relationship, and explore associations with moderate- and vigorous-intensity physical activity.

Methods
Data from 9 prospective cohorts with self-reported leisure-time physical activity and follow-up for cancer incidence were pooled. Multivariable Cox regression was used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs of the relationships between physical activity with incidence of 15 types of cancer. Dose-response relationships were modeled with restricted cubic spline functions that compared 7.5, 15.0, 22.5, and 30.0 MET hours/week to no leisure-time physical activity, and statistically significant associations were determined using tests for trend (P < .05) and 95% CIs (< 1.0).

Results
A total of 755,459 participants (median age, 62 years [range, 32-91 years]; 53% female) were followed for 10.1 years, and 50,620 incident cancers accrued. Engagement in recommended amounts of activity (7.5-15 MET hours/week) was associated with a statistically significant lower risk of 7 of the 15 cancer types studied, including colon (8%-14% lower risk in men), breast (6%-10% lower risk), endometrial (10%-18% lower risk), kidney (11%-17% lower risk), myeloma (14%-19% lower risk), liver (18%-27% lower risk), and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (11%-18% lower risk in women). The dose response was linear in shape for half of the associations and nonlinear for the others. Results for moderate- and vigorous-intensity leisure-time physical activity were mixed. Adjustment for body mass index eliminated the association with endometrial cancer but had limited effect on other cancer types.

Conclusion
Health care providers, fitness professionals, and public health practitioners should encourage adults to adopt and maintain physical activity at recommended levels to lower risks of multiple cancers.

Full document available at Journal of Clinical Oncology

National Prostate Cancer Audit

National Prostate Cancer Audit: Prostate Biopsy Short Report  | Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership

This report evaluates the current national use of transperineal (TP) prostate biopsies and compares differences in the outcomes of TP and transrectal (TR) biopsies. It also examines how the risk of complications is affected by the biopsy approach.

The report finds that the proportion of men undergoing a TP biopsy has nearly doubled within 3 years (14% – 25%), highlighting the increased desire to use this biopsy in certain hospitals.

Full detail at Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership

NHS cancer programme report

NHS England has published a report on performance of the cancer programme in the first half of the financial year 2019/20

The NHS Cancer Programme leads the delivery of the NHS Long Term Plan ambitions for cancer. Leading change at the local level are Cancer Alliances, who work in collaboration with their local Sustainability and Transformation Partnerships (STPs) and Integrated Care Systems (ICSs). This report provides an update on what has been achieved so far to deliver on the NHS Long Term Plan ambitions in quarters one and two for 2019/20.

Full report: NHS cancer programme. Update report April to September 2019