Nurse-led intervention helps carers’ manage medication and cancer pain

The potential benefits of a new nurse-led intervention in supporting carers to manage pain medication in people with terminal cancer are explored in this article | ScienceDaily

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Image source: frankieleon – Flickr // CC BY 2.0

A study funded by Marie Curie and Dimbleby Cancer Care published today shows the potential benefits of a new nurse-led intervention in supporting carers to manage pain medication in people with terminal cancer. Researchers from the University of Southampton, Cardiff University and University of Leeds have developed a nurse-led intervention to help carers with medication management, and evaluated its use in routine practice.

The Cancer Carers’ Medicines Management (CCMM) intervention addresses carers’ beliefs, knowledge and skills and promotes self-evaluation of competence. It centres on a structured conversational process between a nurse and carer. It is the first time that a study has attempted to integrate an intervention developed using input from carers and nurses into routine palliative care. The research showed that the CCMM intervention compared favourably with current practice as it offered a more systematic and comprehensive approach to supporting carer management of pain medicines.

Women with incurable breast cancer receiving insufficient care

Three quarters (76%) of NHS trusts and health boards say that they do not have enough specialist nursing care for people with incurable secondary breast cancer | OnMedica

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The survey of 155 NHS trusts and health boards by Breast Cancer Care found that 42% of organisations surveyed do not provide specialist nursing care for people with incurable breast cancer, in stark comparison to the majority (95%) of people with primary breast cancer having a named clinical nurse specialist for support.

This is despite half (49%) of NHS trusts and health boards saying a main benefit of specialist nursing is reducing lengthy periods in hospital – often unnecessary if symptoms and treatment are managed well – saving the NHS money by freeing up beds.

Read the overview by OnMedica here

New framework sets out expectations for all levels of cancer nursing practice

Evans, N. (2016) Cancer Nursing Practice. 15(10) pp. 8-9. 
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The Career and Education Framework for Cancer Nursing sets out a list of skills, competencies and knowledge expected at seven different levels of practice. It is the culmination of detailed and collaborative working between leading cancer nurses, who say it breaks new ground for the profession.
Read the abstract here