Mindfulness-based interventions for Heamatology and Oncology patients with pain

The journal  Hematology/ Oncology Clinics of America has published a new article on the impact of mindfulness-based interventions on patients with cancer and their experience of pain.

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Abstract

Pain is a reality for approximately half of all of patients with cancer and can negatively affect patient cognitive and emotional states, resulting in “total pain.” Total pain may not respond to pharmacologic interventions and may pave the way for the onset of suffering, where suffering is defined as physical pain accompanied by negative cognitive interpretations. Mindfulness-based interventionsprovide an alternate interpretive framework for both pain and suffering and may lessen a patient’s experience of painMindfulness-based interventions have the potential to alter a patient’s relationship to pain, reducing pain catastrophizing, and enhancing patient reported overall well-being.

Full reference: Hess, D. | (2018) | Mindfulness-Based Interventions for Hematology and Oncology Patients with Pain|Hematology/oncology clinics of North America| 32| (3) | P. 493-504.

Rotherham NHS staff can request the full article here 

Integrating systematic pain assessment and management into routine care using a simple tool improves pain outcomes for patients with cancer-related pain

 The findings of a cluster randomized (1:1) trial have been published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology’s website. The researchers leading the trial sought to compare the effect of a policy adding a clinician- delivered bedside pain assessment and management tool (Edinburgh Pain Assessment and management Tool [EPAT]) to usual care (UC) versus UC alone on pain outcomes.

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Employing a two-arm, parallel group, cluster randomized (1:1) trial, the scientists observed pain outcomes in 19 cancer centres in the UK, these centres were randomly assigned to implement EPAT or to continue UC. As part of the trial they enrolled 1,921 patients, with a mean age of 60; 49% of whom were female with a variety of cancer types.

The findings of this multicentre, cluster randomized trial indicate that a policy of integrating systematic pain assessment and management into routine cancer centre care using a simple tool (EPAT) improves pain outcomes for patients with moderate or severe cancer-related pain.
The scientists conclude that the centres employing EPAT had greater improvements in prescribing practice and in the Brief Pain Inventory Short Form pain subscale score. Other pain and distress outcomes and opioid adverse effects did not differ between EPAT and UC.

Abstract

Purpose
 Pain is suboptimally managed in patients with cancer. We aimed to compare the effect of a policy of adding a clinician-delivered bedside pain assessment and management tool (Edinburgh Pain Assessment and management Tool [EPAT]) to usual care (UC) versus UC alone on pain outcomes.

Patients and Methods

 

The full article can be read at Journal of Clinical Oncology, where it has been published online

Reference: DOI: 10.1200/JCO.2017.76.1825 Journal of Clinical Oncology – published online before print March 15, 2018

 

Nurse-led intervention helps carers’ manage medication and cancer pain

The potential benefits of a new nurse-led intervention in supporting carers to manage pain medication in people with terminal cancer are explored in this article | ScienceDaily

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Image source: frankieleon – Flickr // CC BY 2.0

A study funded by Marie Curie and Dimbleby Cancer Care published today shows the potential benefits of a new nurse-led intervention in supporting carers to manage pain medication in people with terminal cancer. Researchers from the University of Southampton, Cardiff University and University of Leeds have developed a nurse-led intervention to help carers with medication management, and evaluated its use in routine practice.

The Cancer Carers’ Medicines Management (CCMM) intervention addresses carers’ beliefs, knowledge and skills and promotes self-evaluation of competence. It centres on a structured conversational process between a nurse and carer. It is the first time that a study has attempted to integrate an intervention developed using input from carers and nurses into routine palliative care. The research showed that the CCMM intervention compared favourably with current practice as it offered a more systematic and comprehensive approach to supporting carer management of pain medicines.

Opioid doses and the survival of advanced cancer patients receiving palliative care

Sathornviriyapong, A. et al. BMC Palliative Care. Published online: 21 November 2016

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Image source: Adrian Wressell, Heart of England NHSFT – Wellcome Images // CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Background: Concerns that opioids may hasten death can be a cause of the physicians’ reluctance to prescribe opioids, leading to inadequate symptom palliation. Our aim was to find if there was an association between different opioid doses and the survival of the cancer patients that participated in our palliative care program.

Conclusions: Our study has demonstrated that different opioid doses in advanced cancer patients are not associated with shortened survival period.

Read the full abstract and article here

Breakthrough cancer pain: twenty-five years of study

Mercadante, S. & Portenoy, R. K. (2016) Pain157(12) pp. 2657–2663

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Breakthrough cancer pain (BTcP) is an episode of severe pain that “breaks through” a period of persistent pain at least partly controlled by a stable opioid regimen. Although mentioned in the literature decades ago, it has been only 25 years since the first effort to define and measure it.

Controversy about the definition of BTcP continues despite an international effort to achieve consensus. Nevertheless, common approaches to measurement of BTcP have led to a robust literature, including many surveys that have described prevalence, characteristics, and association with adverse outcomes. Measurement also has been important for clinical trials of new drug formulations specifically designed for BTcP. Several approaches have been reported in the literature, although most of them have never been substantiated with appropriate studies. Administration of an opioid as needed is the most common treatment.

Twenty-five years of research has produced a more refined understanding of the safety and efficacy of oral opioids in this context, and provided the clinical trials data necessary to attain regulatory approval of multiple new formulations specifically developed for BTcP. Transmucosal formulations of fentanyl may provide meaningful analgesia within 5 to 15 minutes. Given the difference in cost, transmucosal formulations should be considered in a subset of patients with BTcP, including those with pain that are not adequately controlled with an oral drug and those with distress associated with the rapid pain onset. The long-term use of opioids for BTcP remains to be clarified. Future studies should assess the potential of personalized treatment of BTcP.

Read the abstract here

Cancer patients not getting adequate pain relief

Many terminal cancer patients are not getting adequate pain relief early enough, according to an English study.| Science Daily | PAIN

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Many terminal cancer patients are not getting adequate pain relief early enough, according to a University of Leeds study.  The researchers found that, on average, terminal cancer patients were given their first dose of a strong opioid such as morphine just nine weeks before their death.  Yet many people with terminal cancer suffer with pain a long time before that, the researchers said.

The research team used UK Cancer Registry data to study a sample of 6,080 patients who died of the disease between 2005 and 2012. They found that 48 per cent of the patients were issued a prescription in general practice (primary care) for a strong opioid medication, such as morphine, during the last year of their life.

The study, published in the medical journal Pain, said efforts to improve treatment of cancer pain may be being hindered by concern over the ongoing ‘opioid epidemic’.

They cited NHS data which showed that overall opioid prescribing increased by 466 per cent between 2000 and 2010, but only increased by 16 per cent for patients with cancer.

Full reference: Lucy Ziegler et. al. Opioid prescribing for patients with cancer in the last year of life. PAIN, Published Ahead of Print 2016

Vitamin D and patients with palliative cancer

Björkhem-Bergman, L. & Bergman, P. (2016) BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care. 6:287-291

dandelion-1557110_960_720Vitamin D is a hormone that is synthesised in the skin in the presence of sunlight. Sufficient vitamin D levels are important—not only for a healthy skeleton—but also for a healthy immune system. Many patients with cancer have insufficient vitamin D levels, and low vitamin D levels are associated with increased ‘all-cause mortality’ and especially mortality due to cancer. Low vitamin D levels have also been associated with increased risk of infections, increased pain, depressive disorders and impaired quality of life.

We review the role of vitamin D in the immune system, in relation to cancer disease, pain and depression. We have recently performed an observational study in 100 patients with palliative cancer in Sweden. The main result was that low vitamin D levels were associated with higher opioid dose, that is, more pain. We also describe a case report where vitamin D supplementation resulted in radically decreased opioid dose, less pain and better well-being.

Vitamin D supplementation is not connected with any adverse side effects and is easy to administrate. Thus, we hypothesise that vitamin D-supplementation to patients with palliative cancer might be beneficial and could improve their well-being, decrease pain and reduce susceptibility to infections. However, more clinical studies in this field are needed before firm conclusions can be drawn.

Read the full article here