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Welcome to the Cancer Services online newsfeed. Here you’ll find all the latest research, news stories, policy updates and guidelines. View our other newsfeeds for more subject-specific news.

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Cancer screening: informed consent

Public Health England has updated the Cancer Screening: Informed consent guidelines.

These guidelines give commissioners, providers and healthcare professionals in cancer screening information on consent to screening and procedures.

The document covers information and advice on:

  • breast screening
  • cervical screening
  • bowel cancer screening
  • mental capacity and consent

It also provides several template letters for patients withdrawing from programmes.

Changes to cancer waiting times system and dataset

NHS England is planning changes to the cancer waiting times (CWT) system and dataset, which will come into effect from April 2018.

The changes are part of a programme of work to implement the new 28 day faster diagnosis standard by 2020. The CWT system enables CCGs to monitor and manage pathways of care for cancer patients. An information standards notice published on 28 September sets out the forthcoming changes, and an updated guidance document for CWT standards will be published later this year.

Further detail available via NHS Digitial

 

Latest Cancer News via ScienceDaily

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ScienceDaily reports the following Cancer related research:

Zinc can halt the growth of cancer cells, study says
Zinc supplements can significantly inhibit the proliferation of esophageal cancer cells, according to a new study.

Tracking the body’s mini-shuttles
The development of a new technique for labelling the body’s own transporters — exosomes — could have long term benefits in the treatment of life-threatening medical conditions, including cancer.

Scientists create endocytosis on demand by ‘hotwiring’ cells
A solution to the problem of creating endocytosis on demand is being compared to ‘hotwiring’ a car. A team has managed to trigger clathrin-mediated endocytosis in the lab.

Medication that treats parasite infection also has anti-cancer effect
Scientists report a new gene target, KPNB1, for treatment against epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). EOC is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women and has a particularly grim outlook upon diagnosis. They also find that ivermectin exerts an anti-tumor effect on EOC cells by interacting with the KPNB1 gene. Because ivermectin is already approved to treat parasitic infections in patients, experiments for its effectiveness in an anti-cancer regimen is expected to significantly lower costs compared to untested drug compounds.

Ancient ink for cancer treatment
For hundreds of years, Chinese calligraphers have used a plant-based ink to create beautiful messages and art. Now, one group reports that this ink could noninvasively and effectively treat cancer cells that spread, or metastasize, to lymph nodes.

First-in-human testing of new cancer drug reported
The first clinical trials of a new drug that targets solid cancer tumors has now been tested. The Phase 1A clinical trials mark the first time ever the drug, called BXQ-350, was used in people. BXQ-350 is comprised of a human protein called SapC and a human lipid called DOPS.

Quit rates for smoking at their highest for a decade

Success rates for quitting smoking are at their highest level for a decade, according to new figures. Experts suggest the use of e-cigarettes may be an important factor. | via OnMedica

Nearly one in five (19.8%) quit attempts were successful in the first half of 2017, up from an average of 15.7% over the last decade. The figures come from researcher carried out by University College London, with support from Cancer Research UK.

The researchers collected data from over 18,000 participants using cross-sectional household surveys from January 2007 to June 2017. The findings reveal that quit smoking success rates in England in the first six months of 2017 were higher than the average rate during the preceding decade.

Full report: Quit success rates in England 2007-2017

Improving the Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer

Improving the Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer | The University of York Centre for Health Economics

In diagnosing prostate cancer, the objective is to find the men with clinically significant prostate cancer, who are at high risk of metastases and who benefit the most from immediate treatment.

This economic evaluation examines a model which simulates the long-term costs and health consequences of immediate diagnosis and treatment compared with monitoring. By linking the diagnosis outcomes with the long-term costs and consequences, the model evaluates the costs and health consequences of the different diagnosis strategies over the patients’ expected lifetime.

Full document: Improving the diagnosis of prostate cancer

Will cancer ever be cured?

Cancer Reseach UK:  Science Surgery series  

Answering this question isn’t a simple case of ‘yes’ or ‘no’, because it depends on the way that the term ‘cancer’ is defined. The word ‘cancer’ is singular, but it reflects more than just one disease. It should actually be viewed as an umbrella term for a collection of hundreds of different diseases. They all share the fundamental characteristic of rogue cells growing out of control, but each type of cancer, and each person’s individual cancer, is unique and comes with its own set of challenges.

That’s why it’s very unlikely that there will be one single cure that can wipe out all cancers. But, as explained in the short animation below, that doesn’t mean individual cases of cancer can’t be cured:

Read more at Cancer Research UK

New quality of life measure for recovering cancer patients

New ‘quality of life metric’, will use questionnaires to measure how well cancer patients are supported after treatment. | NHS England

NHS England are introducing a new approach to drive improvements in after care which includes personalised plans for people with cancer outlining not only their physical needs, but also other support they may need, such as help at home or financial advice.

The latest national survey shows the vast majority of people with cancer are positive about the NHS care they receive, but there is currently no measure to assess how well patients are supported after treatment.

The new ‘quality of life metric’, which is the first of its kind, will use questionnaires to measure how effective this support is and the data will be made available on My NHS – helping patients, the public, clinicians and health service providers see how well their local after cancer care support is doing.

Full story at NHS England