New report shows more young people surviving cancer

Teenage Cancer Trust | January 2019 | New report shows more young people surviving cancer

A new report from Teenager Cancer Trust uses data collected by NCRAS  (National Cancer Registration and Analysis Service) which has been analysed to identify trends and share finding with partners to improve cancer services and awareness.  Now Teenage Cancer Trust report 13-24 years old who were diagnosed in England up to the end of 2015. The publication marks the first time a detailed analysis has been conducted of cancer rates of the 13 to 24-year age group and shows an encouraging increase in survival rates.

 

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Some of the report’s key findings:

  • Mortality rates of all cancers combined in 13 to 24 year olds have decreased from 42.9 per million in 2001 to 32.3 per million in 2015.
  • The largest reduction in mortality by diagnostic group in England between 2001 and 2015 has been in Leukaemias. There were also reductions seen in mortality from Central Nervous System tumours, bone cancer and in lymphoma.
  • Five-year survival rates for cancer in 13 to 24 year olds have risen from 83% females / 80% males in (2001-05) to 87% in females / 84 % males (2007-11).
  • There are statistically significant variations in incidence and survival rates of cancer in 13 to 24 year olds based on geography and deprivation.
  • The incidence of cancer in 13 to 24 years olds in England has increased from a crude rate of 233.1 per million in 2001, to 299.7 per million in 2015 (Source: Teenage Cancer Trust).

News release Teenage Cancer Trust New report shows more young people surviving cancer

The report is available to read and download from Teenage Cancer Trust 

BMJ Cancer: more young people in England are surviving

In the news: BBC News Teenage cancer survival ‘on the up’ in England, report finds

Cancer registration: patient information leaflet

Public Health England | January 2019 | Cancer registration: patient information leaflet

Cancer registration: why it matters and what you need to know, is a leaflet for health professionals to distribute to cancer patients explaining what the cancer registry is and what it does.

This leaflet should be given to cancer patients to help them understand:

  • why information about cancer is recorded
  • the benefits of recording cancer data
  • how this information is used
  • how they can see their record
  • how they can have their information removed (PHE)
assets.publishing.service.gov.uk
Image source: assets.publishing.service.gov.uk

Cancer registration: why it matters and what you need to know 

[NICE] Regorafenib for previously treated advanced hepatocellular carcinomaTechnology appraisal guidance [TA555]

NICE| January 2019 | Regorafenib for previously treated advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

Final guidance from NICE which recommends Regorafenib as a possible treatment for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (liver cancer) for the treatment as a possible treatment for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (liver cancer) in adults who have had sorafenib and have:

  • a tumour that can’t be removed by surgery (unresectable)
  • Child–Pugh grade A liver impairment
  • an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group status of 0 or 1.

Full details at NICE 

Childhood cancer burden: a review of global estimates

Bhakta, N.|(2019| Childhood cancer burden: a review of global estimates| The Lancet Oncology| 20|1| e42|e53.

A new article in the Lancet Oncology analyses 4 studies of the global cancer burden that included data for children and adolescents, with the aim that these data could help stakeholders to develop plans for national and institutional cancer programmes.

The Review provides guidance on improving future estimates of the childhood global cancer burden, as the data in low-income and middle-income countries is scarce. As such the researchers propose several recommendations to strengthen data collection and standardise analyses.

Summary

5-year net survival of children and adolescents diagnosed with cancer is approximately 80% in many high-income countries. This estimate is encouraging as it shows the substantial progress that has been made in the diagnosis and treatment of childhood cancer. Unfortunately, scarce data are available for low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs), where nearly 90% of children with cancer reside, suggesting that global survival estimates are substantially worse in these regions. As LMICs are undergoing a rapid epidemiological transition, with a shifting burden from infectious diseases to non-communicable diseases, cancer care for all ages has become a global focus. To improve outcomes for children and adolescents diagnosed with cancer worldwide, an accurate appraisal of the global burden of childhood cancer is a necessary first step. In this Review, we analyse four studies of the global cancer burden that included data for children and adolescents. Each study used various overlapping and non-overlapping statistical approaches and outcome metrics. Moreover, to provide guidance on improving future estimates of the childhood global cancer burden, we propose several recommendations to strengthen data collection and standardise analyses. Ultimately, these data could help stakeholders to develop plans for national and institutional cancer programmes, with the overall aim of helping to reduce the global burden of cancer in children and adolescents.
Rotherham NHS staff may request this article from the Library 

Best supportive care in advanced lung cancer—more than a label?

Bowden, J. et al | 2018 | Best supportive care in advanced lung cancer—more than a label?| BMJ|  363 |k5017.

In new analysis published in the BMJ, researchers including experts in palliative medicine discuss how they developed an innovative model of best supportive care to ensure that all people with advanced lung cancer in Fife, Scotland, were offered a minimum standard of care. 

Athens users can read the article at the BMJ  or Rotherham NHS staff can request it from the Library

 

Genome sequencing of children promises a new era in oncology

Wise J.| 2019|Genome sequencing of children promises a new era in oncology  doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.l105

All children with cancer in England will be offered whole genome sequencing from this year in a move that will enable more comprehensive and precise diagnosis and access to more personalised treatments.

According to NHS England’s long term plan, this will reduce the use of harmful drugs and interventions, support increased access to clinical trials, and reduce the number of young patients who have health problems caused by chemotherapy and radiotherapy

Darren Hargrave, honorary consultant paediatric oncologist at Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children and a member of the paediatric cancer task group which advised NHS England  says there are three major benefits:

  • precision medicine
  • refinement of diagnosis
  • and screening for family members

It was also announced that children who need proton beam therapy will be able to access it in England rather than having to travel abroad. New proton beam facilities have been commissioned in London and Manchester, and will come online in the next couple of years (Source: BMJ)

Read the full, unabridged article at BMJ