National Bowel Cancer Audit

Health Quality Improvement Programme | December 2018 | Bowel Cancer Audit

The latest annual National Bowel Cancer Audit from the Health Quality Improvement Programme (HQIP) details data from over 30,000 patients diagnosed with bowel cancer between 01 April 2016 and 31 March 2017.

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Image source: hqip.org.uk

This  audit report describes some ongoing improvements such as mortality rates following both elective and emergency surgery falling over the past five years and increased numbers of operations being performed laparoscopically.

This year’s report has also described geographical variation in chemotherapy administration and further work is required to better describe and understand this. It is encouraging to see that there has been a reducing trend of deaths in hospital from 2011 to 2016 (46.2% – 34.6%) (Source: HQIP) .

2018 Annual Report 

Patient Report 2018 

Bowel cancer waiting times figures revealed

University of Edinburgh | November 2018| Bowel cancer waiting times figures revealed

Bowel cancer is the fourth most common cancer type, now researchers from the University of Edinburgh have shown that it takes 10% of  patients in England and Wales more than a year from recognising the symptoms to receiving treatment for their bowel cancer. They found that 10% of people with bowel cancer in Scotland waited more than 8 months to start treatment. 

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This international study included anonymised medical data from 3000 patients and their doctors in Australia, and Canada alongside the UK. Among their findings people in Wales took the longest to contact their GP once they had a health concern. Patients in Wales also waited the longest time (168 days)  to commence treatment,  which contrasts with Denmark (77 days. Researchers found that men and women in Wales took the longest to contact their doctor once they had noticed a health concern or symptom (Source: University of Edinburgh).

Full details from University of Edinburgh 

Bowel screening to start at 50

Public Health England & Steve Brine MP | August 2018 | Bowel screening to start at 50

The independent expert screening committee has recommended that bowel cancer screening in England should in future start 10 years earlier at age 50.

Currently, men and women, aged 60 to 74, are invited for bowel screening and are sent a home test kit every 2 years to provide stool samples.

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Following a comprehensive review of the evidence, the committee recommends that screening should be offered from aged 50 to 74 using the faecal immunochemical home test kit (FIT).

The full press release can be viewed at Public Health England 

Related: National Bowel Cancer Audit: The feasibility of reporting patient outcome measures

National Bowel Cancer Audit: The feasibility of reporting patient outcome measures

Health Quality Improvement Programme | August 2018| National Bowel Cancer Audit: The feasibility of reporting patient outcome measures as part of  of a national colorectal cancer audit

Health Quality Improvement Programme  (HQIP)  has published the National Bowel Cancer Audit: The feasibility of reporting patient outcome measures

NHS England’s National Cancer PROMs Programme of the National Survivorship Initiative2 collected Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) for colorectal cancer patients in a one-off study in 2013. Patients were between one- and three-years from diagnosis at the point of being surveyed.

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The aim of this study was to link the Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) for colorectal cancer patients in a one-off study in 2013, survey data to the National Bowel Cancer Audit (NBOCA) data to establish the feasibility of reporting PROMs as part of a national clinical audit. This was assessed according to i) the characteristics of responders compared to all eligible patients ii) the representativeness of the responders at different points along their pathway from diagnosis, iii) hospital trust variation in response rate, and iv) the validity of the measures in comparison to NBOCA measures (Source: HQIP).

The full report is available from HQIP here 
Of interest:

Public Health England & Steve Brine MP Bowel screening to start at 50

Bowel cancer screening

Guidance for providers of bowel scope screening within the NHS Bowel Cancer Screening Programme in England | Public Health England

The UK National Screening Committee recommended the addition of bowel scope screening alongside the existing guaiac faecal occult blood test (gFOBT) following a clinical trial and 11 years of follow-up. These standard operating procedures (SOPs) help commissioners and providers in establishing and implementing bowel scope screening.

Full detail at Public Health England

Aspirin: a cure for bowel cancer?

University of Edinburgh |  June 2018 | Aspirin’s anti-cancer effects revealed

Researchers at the University of Edinburgh have discovered aspirin blocks a key process linked to tumour formation. Although aspirin  is recognised for its ability to reduce an individual’s risk of developing colon cancer-if taken regularly- its tumour fighting properties have been little understood. The team looked at the impact of taking aspirin to fight bowel cancer; focusing on a structure found inside cells called the nucleolus. They tested aspirin tumour biopsies removed from patients with colon cancer, and cells grown in the lab. Their research discovered that aspirin blocks TIF-IA a key molecule essential to the functioning of the nucleolus (via University of Edinburgh).
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Full press release from University of Edinburgh here 

The full article is available to read from Nucleic Acids Research

Chen, J. et al |2018|  Identification of a novel TIF-IA–NF-κB nucleolar stress response pathway| Nucleic Acids Research| gky455| https://doi.org/10.1093/nar/gky455

In the media:

BBC News Aspirin ‘helps block tumour formation’

 

 

 

Bowel Cancer Awareness Month

Bowel Cancer UK  |  Bowel Cancer Awareness Month 2018

April 2018 is bowel cancer  awareness month and Bowel Cancer UK has produced a range of resources to raise awareness. Their mission is to ensure that by 2050, no-one will die of bowel cancer.

Bowel cancer is the UK’s second biggest cancer killer however it shouldn’t be because it is treatable and curable especially if diagnosed early. Nearly everyone diagnosed at the earliest stage will survive bowel cancer but this drops significantly as the disease develops. (Bowel Cancer UK)

Bowel Cancer
Image source: bowelcanceruk.org.uk

The resources including more information about the symptoms of bowel cancer are available at Bowel Cancer UK

 

The poster can be downloaded from Bowel Cancer UK here

 

Related:

NIHR | Three-month course of chemotherapy as effective as six months following surgery for bowel cancer

 

In the media:

BBC News  | Ex-health secretary being treated for bowel cancer