NHS strikes deal on first in a new generation of cancer busting drugs

NHS England | April 2020 | NHS strikes deal on first in a new generation of cancer busting drugs

The NHS has struck a deal which will see hundreds of people a year benefit from a ‘game-changing’ new cancer treatment.

Larotrectinib, will initially be used for children, young people and some adults, and targets tumours according to their genetic make-up, rather than where they originated from in the body.

The revolutionary treatment is the first in a new generation of ‘tumour agnostic’ drugs to be made available on the NHS following the deal endorsed by NICE, the organisation that ensures clinical and cost effectiveness.

Larotrectinib, also known as Vitrakvi, can be used against a wide range of cancers and could offer hope to patients with rare forms of the disease that may previously have been untreatable.

Further details available from NHS England

Breast cancer drugs option joins cancer drugs fund

A potentially life-extending drug combination for some people with advanced breast cancer will now be available under the cancer drugs fund (CDF) following approval by NICE and publication of draft guidance

The draft guidance recommends ribociclib (also called Kisqali and made by Novartis) used with fulvestrant as an option for people with hormone receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative, locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer who have had previous endocrine therapy.

The positive recommendation follows an improved patient access scheme by the company as part of a commercial arrangement.

Clinical trial evidence suggests that, compared with fulvestrant alone, ribociclib with fulvestrant increases the length of time before the disease progresses. However, it is not known whether ribociclib increases the length of time people live, because the final trial results are not available yet.

The committee recognised that ribociclib with fulvestrant has the potential to be cost-effective, and therefore recommended it for use on the CDF. This will allow more evidence to be collected to address the uncertainties around overall survival and cost-effectiveness.

Full dtail at NICE

NHS prepares to fast-track ‘game changing’ cancer drugs that target genetic mutations

The NHS is preparing to fast-track the introduction of ‘game changing’ new cancer drugs that target tumours according to their genetic make-up rather than where they originate in the body | NHS England

The revolutionary treatments – known as ‘tumour agnostic’ drugs – can be used against a wide range of cancers and could offer hope to patients with rare forms of the disease that may previously have been untreatable.

The first of the new cancer drugs, which target genetic mutations that accelerate the growth of many types of tumours and have particular benefits for children, are set to come on to the market within months.

With such treatments, testing the tumour’s genes or other molecular features assists in deciding which treatments may be best for an individual with cancer, regardless of where the cancer is located or how it looks under the microscope. Molecular testing therefore becomes a first and essential element of treatment planning.

Around 850 patients a year could benefit from the frontrunners while many thousands a year are eventually expected to benefit from other tumour agnostic treatments on the horizon.

Full story at NHS England

 

University of Nottingham Study: Drugs for invasive breast cancer ‘could treat earliest stages of the disease’

University of Nottingham | May 2019 | Drugs for invasive breast cancer ‘could treat earliest stages of the disease’

Experts from the University of Nottingham’s School of Medicine have undertaken research that has found drugs used to target HER2-positive invasive breast cancer may also be successful in treating women in the first stages of the disease.

The HER2 gene is already closely associated with aggressive, invasive breast cancer and is already treated using the drug trastuzumab, more commonly known as Herceptin.

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The Nottingham study looked at breast tissue from 776 women treated at Nottingham City Hospital between 1990 and 2012 for DCIS. It also collected information from 239 cases of DCIS and invasive breast cancer for comparison.

Following up on cases between two months and 20 years later, the team found that out of 308 patients treated with breast conserving surgery alone, the disease had reoccurred in 67 people (22 per cent). More than half of those (57 per cent) had gone on to develop aggressive, invasive breast cancer. Among the 93 cases treated with surgery and radiotherapy, the cancer came back in eight patients – two with invasive breast cancer and six with DCIS.

The researchers suggest that screening women with DCIS for HER2 may help to identify those at greater risk of developing more invasive forms of the disease.

Current treatments targeting HER2 could also potentially be extended to DCIS patients to reduce the chance of the cancer spreading and reduce the number of HER2-related deaths (Source: University of Nottingham).

Read the full, unabridged news story from the University of Nottingham

NICE: Promising lung cancer treatment (durvalumab) approved for Cancer Drugs Fund

NICE |  March 2019 | Promising lung cancer treatment approved for Cancer Drugs Fund

NICE has unveiled a promising lung cancer treatment has been approved for the Cancer Drugs Fund, as a result of a NICE recommendation. Today NICE has published draft final guidance.

Durvalumab helps the body’s immune system to find and attack cancer cells, by blocking the PD-L1 protein which disguises cancer.

In a clinical trial people taking it went for an average of around 2 years without the disease progressing, versus 6 months for those without. The committee agreed that it was plausible that between 27% and 40% of people taking durvalumab would have 5 years of progression-free survival.

The draft guidance is available from NICE 

Read the full details from NICE 

See also:

NICE Lung cancer: diagnosis and management

University of Newcastle Promising lung cancer treatment available on the NHS

Trial to test new treatment combination for children and adults with Leukemia

University of Birmingham | June 2018 | Trial to test new treatment combination for children and adults with Leukaemia

A clinical trial testing a new treatment combination in patients with leukaemia launches through the Combinations Alliance, a joint initiative between Cancer Research UK and the Experimental Cancer Medicine Centres (ECMC) Network based at University of Birmingham.

Researchers want to discover whether pharmaceutical companies AstraZeneca and MSD’s experimental medicine, selumetinib (AZD6244, ARRY-142886), can be effective in combination with a treatment, dexamethasone, already used for several conditions including leukaemia.

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This clinical trial, the first of its kind to include both adults and children is based at the  Cancer Research UK Clinical Trials Unit at the University of Birmingham. This trial is planned to open in 23 centres throughout the UK and in 11 additional centres in 6 European countries, to help recruit 42 patients.

Professor Josef Vormoor, international clinical lead for the trial, said: ‘Although there are effective treatments for leukaemia, for some patients, the disease can return after they have been treated. If this combination is successful, it could give us an urgently needed new way to treat patients who have relapsed and have few treatment options left.’ (Source:University of Birmingham)

The full press release can be read at the University of Birmingham’s website 
Further details on the clinical trial are available from Cancer Research 

NHS England strikes deal on new NICE recommended lung cancer immunotherapy drug

NHS England | June 2018 | NHS England strikes deal on new NICE recommended lung cancer immunotherapy drug

NHS England have announced it will make lung cancer drug pembrolizumab available for routine use on the NHS.   Trial results show pembrolizumab  extends life for certain adults with lung cancer for more than a year.

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According to NHS England Pembrolizumab is the first drug to exceed the new budget impact threshold for new products costing more than £20 million a year. The drug, which is also called Keytruda, would have cost around £84,000 per patient at its full list price. NHS England and MSD have agreed a confidential arrangement for reimbursement which will enable NICE to recommend it be routinely available on the NHS (NHS England).

 

The full announcement is available at NHS England