Rapid Diagnostic Centres Vision and 2019/20 Implementation Specification

NHS England | July 2019 | Rapid Diagnostic Centres Vision and 2019/20 Implementation Specification

NHS England have released Rapid Diagnostic Centres Vision and 2019/20 Implementation Specification the purpose of this document is to outline the draft vision and approach for how Rapid Diagnostic Centres (RDCs)  will develop and support the transformation of cancer diagnosis services over time and provide an implementation specification for Cancer Alliances to begin setting up RDCs in 2019/20.

Rapid Diagnostic Centres Vision and 2019/20 Implementation Specification

 

New life-saving treatment and diagnosis technology

Diseases could be detected even before people experience symptoms, thanks to a pioneering new health-data programme as part of the government’s modern Industrial Strategy

Businesses and charities are expected to jointly invest up to £160 million, alongside a £79 million government investment, as part of the Accelerating Detection of Disease programme. The project will support research, early diagnosis, prevention and treatment for diseases including cancer, dementia and heart disease.

The pioneering initiative will recruit up to 5 million healthy people. Volunteered data from the individuals will help UK scientists and researchers invent new ways to detect and prevent the development of diseases.

Full story: UK to innovate new life-saving treatment and diagnosis technology | Department of Health & Social Care

Early cancer detection and survival to be prioritised by NHS

Monitoring one-year survival will be central to measuring progress in transforming cancer care, the Health and Social Care Secretary has announced.

Screening programmes will be overhauled and diagnosis made faster and more accurate with new state-of-the-art technology as part of a blueprint for rapidly improving cancer detection and survival the Health and Social Care Secretary Matt Hancock has announced.

Speaking in the House of Commons, the Health and Social Care Secretary set out how the NHS will deliver on its commitments to improve early detection of cancer.

In January, the NHS Long Term Plan set the ambition for three-quarters of all cancers to be detected at an early stage and 55,000 more people surviving cancer for 5 years each year by 2028. The Implementation Framework, agreed by the NHS, provides a blueprint for how this will be achieved at a local level. The one-year metric will be used to measure progress.

Steps in the framework include:

  • a radical overhaul of screening programmes
  • new state-of-the-art technology to make diagnosis faster and more accurate
  • more investment in research and innovation
  • the roll-out of new Rapid Diagnostic Centres across the country, building on the success of a pilot scheme with Cancer Resarch UK
  • NHS England extending lung health checks, targeting areas with the lowest survival rates
  • Health Education England increasing the cancer workforce, which will lead to 400 clinical endoscopists and 300 reporting radiographers by 2021

The document sets out the framework through which each of the 300 commitments in the Long Term Plan will be delivered – including the 20 headline commitments – as well as how government will monitor and support systems at a local level.

Full detail at Department of Health and Social Care

Annual NHS cancer checks top two million for the first time

For the first time last year, the NHS in England carried out more than two million checks on people who feared they might have cancer.

In 2018, patients underwent a record 2.2 million cancer checks following urgent referral by their GP, almost 6,000 a day or more than four every minute. That was an increase of almost a quarter of a million on the 1.9 million people who were seen in 2017.

Record numbers of people also received treatment for cancer, with 308,058 receiving a first treatment in 2018, almost 13,000 more than in 2017 and the first time the number has topped 300,000.

Cancer survival is at an all time high with new figures showing 10,000 more patients surviving for at least 12 months after diagnosis than five years earlier. However, the NHS Long Term Plan aims to increasing the proportion of cancers caught early from half to three quarters, an improvement that will save up to 55,000 more lives each year.

Full story at NHS England

[NICE guideline] Lung cancer: diagnosis and management [NG122]

NICE | March 2019 | Lung cancer: diagnosis and management NICE guideline 

This guideline covers diagnosing and managing non-small-cell and small-cell lung cancer. It aims to improve outcomes for patients by ensuring that the most effective tests and treatments are used, and that people have access to suitable palliative care and follow-up (Source: NICE).

Full details from NICE 

 

Early diagnosis of cancer

The Department of Health and Social Care has announced plans for the earlier diagnosis of cancer. 

hospital-3098683_1920

As part of the long-term plan for the NHS, a package of measures will be rolled out across the country with the aim of seeing 3 out of 4 of all cancers detected at an early stage by 2028.  The plan will:

  • overhaul screening programmes
  • provide new investment in state-of-the-art technology to transform the process of diagnosis
  • boost research and innovation

Screening programmes will be made more accessible and easier to use. They will be based on the latest breakthrough research and technology. Those at risk will be able to benefit from options including:

  • new tests for bowel cancer
  • mobile lung screening units
  • the roll-out of rapid diagnostic centres across the country with same-day testing

Full story: Government announces plans for earlier diagnosis for cancer patients