Bowel cancer screening

Guidance for providers of bowel scope screening within the NHS Bowel Cancer Screening Programme in England | Public Health England

The UK National Screening Committee recommended the addition of bowel scope screening alongside the existing guaiac faecal occult blood test (gFOBT) following a clinical trial and 11 years of follow-up. These standard operating procedures (SOPs) help commissioners and providers in establishing and implementing bowel scope screening.

Full detail at Public Health England

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GPs urged to make most of cancer screening dashboard

 

laptop-3324201_1920NHS Digital in a press release, has urged GPs and health organisations to help to improve rates of potentially lifesaving cervical screening by making the most of an innovative online data tool. The interactive data dashboard provides in-depth information on screening levels and shows where they could be improved. It was launched a year ago by NHS Digital, Public Health England (PHE) and Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust. Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs), GP practices and local authorities can look up their data to see where to focus work on improving coverage rates of the vital test.

The interactive dashboards containing quarterly figures are available for GP data, for Clinical Commissioning Group data and for local authority data.

PSA Screening for Prostate Cancer

This article by Scott Gavura discusses the findings of a recent study which concluded that PSA screening for prostate cancer offers no survival benefits | via Science based Medicine

In this article, the author discusses the controversy surrounding PSA testing, and the findings of a new study, “Effect of a Low-Intensity PSA-Based Screening Intervention on Prostate Cancer Mortality”

The study included over 400,000 British men aged 50-69. Men were randomized into an RN appointment, where they were offered information on a PSA test, and if they chose, the test. The other group didn’t invite men for testing. After a 10 year period, the study found that there were more prostate cancers detected from this one-time testing. However, this group was no less likely to die from prostate cancer.

Given there was no difference in mortality between the two groups Gavura asks the question as to whether to PSA screen or not?

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Image source: Cancer Research UK

Full article: Gavura, S | PSA Screening for Prostate Cancer | Science based Medicine

Link to the research: Martin, R. et al .| Effect of a Low-Intensity PSA-Based Screening Intervention on Prostate Cancer MortalityThe CAP Randomized Clinical Trial  | JAMA | 2018 Vol 319(9) p883–895

 

Related: Why a one-off PSA test for prostate cancer is doing men more harm than good | Cancer Research UK

Bowel cancer screening programme: standards

Public Health England | March 2018 | Bowel cancer screening programme: standards 

Public Health England (PHE)  has published screening standards for the NHS bowel cancer screening programme (BCSP). 

Screening standards ensure that stakeholders have access to:

  • reliable and timely information about the quality of the screening programme
  • data at local, regional and national level
  • quality measures across the screening pathway without gaps or duplications

 The most recent standards apply to data collected from 1 April 2018 and replace previous versions.

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The sceening standards can be found at PHE
Bowel cancer screening programme standards valid for data collected from 1 April 2018 can be accessed from PHE 

 

Single blood test screens for eight cancer types

Researchers have developed a single blood test that screens for eight common cancer types and helps identify the location of the cancer | Via ScienceDaily | Science

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A single blood test has been developed that screens for eight common cancer types and helps identify the location of the cancer. The test, called CancerSEEK, is a unique noninvasive, multianalyte test that simultaneously evaluates levels of eight cancer proteins and the presence of cancer gene mutations from circulating DNA in the blood. The test is aimed at screening for eight common cancer types that account for more than 60 percent of cancer deaths in the U.S. Five of the cancers covered by the test currently have no screening test.

The test was evaluated on 1,005 patients with nonmetastatic, stages I to III cancers of the ovary, liver, stomach, pancreas, esophagus, colorectum, lung or breast. The median overall sensitivity, or the ability to find cancer, was 70 percent and ranged from a high of 98 percent for ovarian cancer to a low of 33 percent for breast cancer. For the five cancers that have no screening tests — ovarian, liver, stomach, pancreatic and esophageal cancers — sensitivity ranged from 69 percent to 98 percent.

Full story at ScienceDaily

Full reference: Cohen, J. D. et al. | Detection and localization of surgically resectable cancers with a multi-analyte blood test | Science | 18 Jan 2018

Bowel cancer screening

Public Health England is calling on all men and women, aged over 60, to get screened for bowel cancer after the latest figures show over 40% are not getting tested. Embarrassment over providing a stool sample is one of the reasons, among men in particular, behind thousands being unnecessarily at risk of dying.

Bowel cancer screening is offered to all men and women aged 60 to 74, who are sent a home test kit to provide stool samples.  There were over 3,000 bowel cancers diagnosed as a result of screening in 2016 to 2017. In over 90% of these cases, cancers were found at an early stage, where treatment is more likely to be successful.

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Image source: http://www.gov.uk

Bowel cancer is the fourth most common cancer in England, but the second leading cause of cancer deaths, with around 13,000 people dying from it every year.

If detected early, bowel cancer is very treatable which is why screening is vital and it has been shown to reduce the risk of dying from bowel cancer by 16%.

The latest NHS Screening Programmes in England annual report details the progress and activities of the NHS population screening programmes.

PHE press release: Men and women asked not to miss out on bowel screening

NHS England action to save lives by catching more cancers early

NHS England announces the scaling up of an innovative scheme that catches lung cancer early by scanning patients, along with new details of a more sensitive bowel cancer test that could save thousands of lives.

NHS England is now funding scanners in other areas as part of a national programme to diagnose cancer earlier, improve the care for those living with cancer and ensure each cancer patient gets the right care for them. This follows the success of the Manchester scanner scheme, where mobile scanners are detecting four out of five cases of lung cancer in the early stages when it is easier to treat. The mobile scanning trucks have picked up one cancer for every 33 patients scanned over the course of a year.

Plans for ‘FIT’, a more sensitive bowel cancer test that could see as many as 1,500 more cancer caught earlier every year have also been confirmed.

‘FIT’ is an easy to use home testing kit which predicts bowel cancer, following the introduction of the test almost a third of a million more people are expected to complete screening. The sensitivity level determines the number of people who should go on for further cancer testing.