Breast screening: leading a service

Information for local providers and commissioners on leading NHS breast screening services | Public Health England

This guidance sets out the principles for the organisation and leadership of local breast screening services.  The guidance is aimed at those who are responsible for making sure breast screening services are managed in a professional and effective way. This involves meeting agreed standards and continually striving to improve performance.

The guidance looks at the following areas:

1.Senior leadership team roles

2.Core management skills for the senior leadership team

3.Organisation of screening services

4.Breast screening service workforce

Full guidance: Breast screening: leading a service

The NHS breast screening programme (BSP) covers the screening pathway from identification of the eligible population to diagnosis of women with breast cancer.

Related content:  NHS breast screening (BSP) programme

Social media boost for breast screening

More women attend for breast screening thanks to success of digital inclusion project | NHS Digital

An NHS project using social media to improve health by boosting digital inclusion has led to a 13 per cent increase in first time attendances for breast screening in Stoke-on-Trent over four years.

The local initiative saw information about screening posted on Facebook community groups, which empowered and enabled women to make appointments by reducing their anxiety around breast examinations. It also allowed them to communicate quickly and easily with health practitioners to ask questions about the screening process.

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Through this project, the North Midlands Breast Screening Service promoted their Facebook page on local community groups which their target group – women aged over 50 – regularly visited.

The screening team posted information such as patients explaining about how the screening process works and how it has affected them, and videos showing the rooms where it takes place. Posts were designed to encourage women to share them and so spread the message about the benefits and importance of screening.

The service’s Facebook page also answered questions in the group and by direct messaging, enabling women to book appointments more easily.

Full detail: More women attend for breast screening thanks to success of digital inclusion project | NHS Digital

See also: Social media could help raise breast screening take-up | OnMedica

Bowel screening to start at 50

Public Health England & Steve Brine MP | August 2018 | Bowel screening to start at 50

The independent expert screening committee has recommended that bowel cancer screening in England should in future start 10 years earlier at age 50.

Currently, men and women, aged 60 to 74, are invited for bowel screening and are sent a home test kit every 2 years to provide stool samples.

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Following a comprehensive review of the evidence, the committee recommends that screening should be offered from aged 50 to 74 using the faecal immunochemical home test kit (FIT).

The full press release can be viewed at Public Health England 

Related: National Bowel Cancer Audit: The feasibility of reporting patient outcome measures

Bowel cancer screening

Guidance for providers of bowel scope screening within the NHS Bowel Cancer Screening Programme in England | Public Health England

The UK National Screening Committee recommended the addition of bowel scope screening alongside the existing guaiac faecal occult blood test (gFOBT) following a clinical trial and 11 years of follow-up. These standard operating procedures (SOPs) help commissioners and providers in establishing and implementing bowel scope screening.

Full detail at Public Health England

GPs urged to make most of cancer screening dashboard

 

laptop-3324201_1920NHS Digital in a press release, has urged GPs and health organisations to help to improve rates of potentially lifesaving cervical screening by making the most of an innovative online data tool. The interactive data dashboard provides in-depth information on screening levels and shows where they could be improved. It was launched a year ago by NHS Digital, Public Health England (PHE) and Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust. Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs), GP practices and local authorities can look up their data to see where to focus work on improving coverage rates of the vital test.

The interactive dashboards containing quarterly figures are available for GP data, for Clinical Commissioning Group data and for local authority data.

PSA Screening for Prostate Cancer

This article by Scott Gavura discusses the findings of a recent study which concluded that PSA screening for prostate cancer offers no survival benefits | via Science based Medicine

In this article, the author discusses the controversy surrounding PSA testing, and the findings of a new study, “Effect of a Low-Intensity PSA-Based Screening Intervention on Prostate Cancer Mortality”

The study included over 400,000 British men aged 50-69. Men were randomized into an RN appointment, where they were offered information on a PSA test, and if they chose, the test. The other group didn’t invite men for testing. After a 10 year period, the study found that there were more prostate cancers detected from this one-time testing. However, this group was no less likely to die from prostate cancer.

Given there was no difference in mortality between the two groups Gavura asks the question as to whether to PSA screen or not?

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Image source: Cancer Research UK

Full article: Gavura, S | PSA Screening for Prostate Cancer | Science based Medicine

Link to the research: Martin, R. et al .| Effect of a Low-Intensity PSA-Based Screening Intervention on Prostate Cancer MortalityThe CAP Randomized Clinical Trial  | JAMA | 2018 Vol 319(9) p883–895

 

Related: Why a one-off PSA test for prostate cancer is doing men more harm than good | Cancer Research UK

Bowel cancer screening programme: standards

Public Health England | March 2018 | Bowel cancer screening programme: standards 

Public Health England (PHE)  has published screening standards for the NHS bowel cancer screening programme (BCSP). 

Screening standards ensure that stakeholders have access to:

  • reliable and timely information about the quality of the screening programme
  • data at local, regional and national level
  • quality measures across the screening pathway without gaps or duplications

 The most recent standards apply to data collected from 1 April 2018 and replace previous versions.

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The sceening standards can be found at PHE
Bowel cancer screening programme standards valid for data collected from 1 April 2018 can be accessed from PHE