COVID-19 rapid guideline: delivery of radiotherapy NICE guideline

NICE |  March 2020 | COVID-19 rapid guideline: delivery of radiotherapy [NG162]

The purpose of this guideline is to maximise the safety of patients who need radiotherapy and make the best use of NHS resources, while protecting staff from infection. It will also enable services to match the capacity for radiotherapy to patient needs if services become limited because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

This guidance was first published on 28 March 2020.

NICE has also produced a COVID-19 rapid guideline on delivery of systemic anticancer treatments.

This guideline is for:

  • health and care practitioners
  • health and care staff involved in planning and delivering services
  • commissioners

The recommendations bring together

  • existing national and international guidance and policies
  • advice from specialists working in the NHS from across the UK. These include people with expertise and experience of treating patients for the specific health conditions covered by the guidance during the current COVID-19 pandemic.

Full details from NICE

[NICE Consultation] Brain tumours (primary) and brain metastases in adults

NICE |  March 2020 | Brain tumours (primary) and brain metastases in adults | In development [GID-QS10092]

NICE has released a consultation for the 5 key areas for quality improvement which you consider as having the greatest potential to improve the quality of care in this area. 

Closing date for comments: Monday 20 April 2020 at 5pm

Full details from NICE

AI could help breast screening save more lives

Cancer Research UK |February 2020 |AI could help breast screening save more lives

A new blog post from Cancer Research details how artificial intelligence (AI) could help to save more lives in the identification of breast cancer. In collaboration with Google Health the leading cancer charity, has led on research to develop artificial intelligence that not only has the potential to change the way we detect breast cancer but could also save the NHS time and money.  Scientists from these organisation have created a database that contains more than 2000 mammograms (anonymised). The data can be used by academics and commercial partners to benefit patients (Source: Cancer Research UK

database-1954920_640.jpg

Full details about the screening project and how it came to be are available from CRUK 

See also:

Cancer Research UK Artificial intelligence could help breast screening save more lives

OnMedica Artificial intelligence could help breast screening save more lives

Psychological Processes and Symptom Outcomes in Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction for Cancer Survivors: A Pilot Study

Full reference: Chinh, K. | 2020| Psychological Processes and Symptom Outcomes in Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction for Cancer Survivors: A Pilot Study| Mindfulness | https://doi.org/10.1007/s12671-019-01299-0

A study that conducted secondary analyses to examine the effect of mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) for cancer-related fatigue on mindfulness facets, self-compassion, and psychological inflexibility. The researchers also examined whether changes in these processes were associated with the symptom outcomes of fatigue interference, sleep disturbance, and emotional distress.

Abstract

Objectives

Growing evidence supports the efficacy of mindfulness-based interventions for symptoms in cancer survivors. Identifying theory-based psychological processes underlying their effects on symptoms would inform research to enhance their efficacy and cost-effectiveness. We conducted secondary analyses examining the effect of mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) for cancer-related fatigue on mindfulness facets, self-compassion, and psychological inflexibility. We also examined whether changes in these processes were associated with the symptom outcomes of fatigue interference, sleep disturbance, and emotional distress.

Methods

Thirty-five persistently fatigued cancer survivors (94% female, 77% breast cancer survivors) were randomized to either MBSR for cancer-related fatigue or a waitlist control (WC) condition. Self-report measures were administered at pre-intervention, post-intervention, and 1-month follow-up. Then the WC group received MBSR and completed a post-intervention follow-up.

Results

Linear mixed modeling analyses of the first three time points showed steady increases over time for certain mindfulness facets (observing, acting with awareness, and nonjudging) and self-compassion in favor of the MBSR group. When analyzing pre- and post-intervention data across study conditions, none of the psychological processes predicted change in fatigue interference. However, increased nonjudging was associated with decreased sleep disturbance, and increased acting with awareness was associated with decreased emotional distress. Self-compassion did not predict change in symptom outcomes.

Conclusions

Results point to specific psychological processes that may be targeted to maximize the efficacy of future MBSR interventions for cancer survivors.

Rotherham NHS staff can have a copy of this article, just contact RFT Library here 

 

Breast screening programme

Breast Screening Programme, England 2018-19 | NHS Digital |  30 January 2020

Women between the ages of 50 and 70 are invited for regular breast screening (every three years) under a national programme. Screening is intended to reduce mortality by detecting breast cancer at an early stage when there is a better chance of successful treatment.

This report presents information about the NHS Breast Screening Programme in England in 2018-19 and includes data on women invited for breast screening, coverage, uptake of invitations, outcomes of screening and cancers detected.

The publication also features an online interactive dashboard to complement the existing publication resources.

Full report: Breast Screening Programme England, 2018-19 | NHS Digital

Further detail at NHS Digital

Colorectal cancer

Colorectal cancer | NICE guideline [NG151] | January 2020

This guideline covers managing colorectal (bowel) cancer in people aged 18 and over. It aims to improve quality of life and survival for adults with colorectal cancer through management of local disease and management of secondary tumours (metastatic disease).

Recommendations

This guideline includes recommendations on:

See also: Colorectal cancer (Quality Standard 20, updated from Aug 2012)