NHS England strikes deal on new NICE recommended lung cancer immunotherapy drug

NHS England | June 2018 | NHS England strikes deal on new NICE recommended lung cancer immunotherapy drug

NHS England have announced it will make lung cancer drug pembrolizumab available for routine use on the NHS.   Trial results show pembrolizumab  extends life for certain adults with lung cancer for more than a year.

lungs-2803208_1280

According to NHS England Pembrolizumab is the first drug to exceed the new budget impact threshold for new products costing more than £20 million a year. The drug, which is also called Keytruda, would have cost around £84,000 per patient at its full list price. NHS England and MSD have agreed a confidential arrangement for reimbursement which will enable NICE to recommend it be routinely available on the NHS (NHS England).

 

The full announcement is available at NHS England 

Rapid cancer diagnostic and assessment pathways

NHS England has published three rapid cancer diagnostic and assessment pathways.  These documents set out how diagnosis within 14 days and diagnosis within 28 days can be achieved for the colorectal, lung, and prostate cancer pathways:

Implementing a timed colorectal cancer diagnostic pathway:

This handbook sets out how the 28 day standard can be achieved in colorectal cancer patients, in preparation for full monitoring against the standard from April 2020.

Implementing a timed lung cancer diagnostic pathway:

This handbook sets out how the 28 day standard can be achieved for lung cancer patients, in preparation for full monitoring against the standard from April 2020.

Implementing a timed prostate cancer diagnostic pathway:

This handbook sets out how the 28 day standard can be achieved for prostate cancer patients, in preparation for full monitoring against the standard from April 2020.

 

National Lung Cancer Audit 2017- Key findings for patients and carers

Royal College of Physicians | National Lung Cancer Audit 2017-  Key findings for patients and carers | March 2018

The audit is a patient-focused report from the  National Lung Cancer Audit (NLCA), commissioned by the Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership (HQIP) on behalf of NHS England and the Welsh government.

It provides a a summary of key results from the 2017 National Lung Cancer Audit  (NLCA) annual report, which looked at patients who were diagnosed with lung cancer during 2016. The results are based on data from 140  English NHS trusts and 13 Welsh hospital sites.
national lung cancer audit 2017This booklet specifically looks at how organisations performed in key areas  of the patient pathway. It does not include information on the types of treatment or drugs that are available to patients with lung cancer.

Further information is available from HQIP  here 
The full booklet can be accessed via HQIP

Full details of the findings are available from the Royal College of Physicians website

 

National Lung Cancer Audit 2017

National Lung Cancer Audit annual report 2017 | The Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership

This is the 13th annual report on the clinical component (process of care) of the National Lung Cancer Audit. It contains national and named team results on the quality of lung cancer care for patients diagnosed between 1 January and 31 December 2016 and covers many processes of care across the entire patient pathway.

Lung cancer audit
Image source: http://www.hqip.org.uk

Targeted audiences who will benefit from reading the findings of this report include NHS staff in lung cancer multidisciplinary teams; hospital managers and chief executives; commissioners; lung cancer researchers; lung cancer patients their families and their carers who may use the findings to inform their care decisions.

Full report: National Lung Cancer Audit annual report 2017

NHS England action to save lives by catching more cancers early

NHS England announces the scaling up of an innovative scheme that catches lung cancer early by scanning patients, along with new details of a more sensitive bowel cancer test that could save thousands of lives.

NHS England is now funding scanners in other areas as part of a national programme to diagnose cancer earlier, improve the care for those living with cancer and ensure each cancer patient gets the right care for them. This follows the success of the Manchester scanner scheme, where mobile scanners are detecting four out of five cases of lung cancer in the early stages when it is easier to treat. The mobile scanning trucks have picked up one cancer for every 33 patients scanned over the course of a year.

Plans for ‘FIT’, a more sensitive bowel cancer test that could see as many as 1,500 more cancer caught earlier every year have also been confirmed.

‘FIT’ is an easy to use home testing kit which predicts bowel cancer, following the introduction of the test almost a third of a million more people are expected to complete screening. The sensitivity level determines the number of people who should go on for further cancer testing.

 

National lung cancer audit

National Lung Cancer Audit 2016: Key findings for patients and carers | The Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership

NLCA
Image source: http://www.hqip.org.uk

The information in this booklet aimed at patients and carers is a summary of key results from the 2016 National Lung Cancer Audit (NLCA) annual report, which looked at patients diagnosed from 1 January to 31 December 2015.  This booklet specifically looks at how the organisation performed in key areas of the patient pathway. It does not include information on the types of treatment or drugs available to lung cancer patients.

The report can be downloaded here

Immediate chest X-ray for patients at risk of lung cancer presenting in primary care

Neal, R.D. et al. (2017) British Journal of Cancer. 116, pp. 293-302

AS0000184F07 Hospital doctors looking at X-ray of lungs
Image source: Anthea Sieveking – Wellcome Images // CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Background: Achieving earlier stage diagnosis is one option for improving lung cancer outcomes in the United Kingdom. Patients with lung cancer typically present with symptoms to general practitioners several times before referral or investigation.

Conclusions: We have demonstrated the feasibility of individually randomising patients at higher risk of lung cancer, to a trial offering urgent investigation or usual care.

Read the full abstract here