Oral cancer in England

Public Health England | May 2020 | Oral cancer in England

Public Health England (PHE) has published the incidence, survival and mortality rates of oral cancer in England from 2012 to 2016.

This report presents oral cancer data for England held by the National Cancer Registration and Analysis Service (NCRAS) and includes incidence, survival and mortality rates. It covers the period from 2012 to 2016, and the data is presented at national, regional, upper-tier and lower-tier local authority level.

Incidence and mortality rates for oral cancer have risen in recent years, and most cases present with advanced disease, which reduces prognosis. Risk factors for oral cancer include smoking, other ways of using tobacco such as chewing, drinking alcohol and infection with the human papilloma virus (HPV). Treatment may be with surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy or a combination of these.

Stark inequalities in oral cancer exist between geographic areas and population groups, and there are opportunities to prevent oral cancer and to support early detection and treatment. The data in this report identifies the geographic areas and population groups most at risk to facilitate the planning of health improvement initiatives and clinical services.

Full details availalbe from PHE 

Click to access Oral_cancer_report.pdf

 

NHS strikes deal on first in a new generation of cancer busting drugs

NHS England | April 2020 | NHS strikes deal on first in a new generation of cancer busting drugs

The NHS has struck a deal which will see hundreds of people a year benefit from a ‘game-changing’ new cancer treatment.

Larotrectinib, will initially be used for children, young people and some adults, and targets tumours according to their genetic make-up, rather than where they originated from in the body.

The revolutionary treatment is the first in a new generation of ‘tumour agnostic’ drugs to be made available on the NHS following the deal endorsed by NICE, the organisation that ensures clinical and cost effectiveness.

Larotrectinib, also known as Vitrakvi, can be used against a wide range of cancers and could offer hope to patients with rare forms of the disease that may previously have been untreatable.

Further details available from NHS England

[NICE Technology Appraisal Guidance] Lenalidomide with rituximab for previously treated follicular lymphoma

NICE | April 2020 | Lenalidomide with rituximab for previously treated follicular lymphoma |Technology appraisal guidance [TA627]

NICE has produced evidence-based recommendations on lenalidomide (Revlimid) with rituximab for previously treated follicular lymphoma (grade 1 to 3A) in adults.

Full details form NICE 

Lenalidomide with rituximab for previously treated follicular lymphoma

NICE Guideline: COVID-19 rapid guideline: delivery of systemic anticancer treatments

NICE | March  2020 |COVID-19 rapid guideline: delivery of systemic anticancer treatments

NICE guideline [NG161]

The purpose of this guideline is to maximise the safety of patients with cancer and make the best use of NHS resources, while protecting staff from infection. It will also enable services to match the capacity for cancer treatment to patient needs if services become limited because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

On 3 April 2020, NICE added 2 recommendations on when to offer and continue systemic anticancer treatment for patients with COVID-19. NICE also amended the table on prioritising treatments in line with new advice from NHS England.

 

This guideline is for:

  • health and care practitioners
  • health and care staff involved in planning and delivering services
  • commissioners

Further information availlable from NICE 

NICE has also produced a COVID-19 rapid guideline on delivery of radiotherapy.

COVID-19 rapid guideline: delivery of radiotherapy

NICE | March 2020| COVID-19 rapid guideline: delivery of radiotherapy

The purpose of this guideline is to maximise the safety of patients who need radiotherapy and make the best use of NHS resources, while protecting staff from infection. It will also enable services to match the capacity for radiotherapy to patient needs if services become limited because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

NICE has also produced a COVID-19 rapid guideline on delivery of systemic anticancer treatments.

This guideline is for:

  • health and care practitioners
  • health and care staff involved in planning and delivering services
  • commissioners

Full details from NICE

COVID-19 rapid guideline: delivery of radiotherapy NICE guideline

NICE |  March 2020 | COVID-19 rapid guideline: delivery of radiotherapy [NG162]

The purpose of this guideline is to maximise the safety of patients who need radiotherapy and make the best use of NHS resources, while protecting staff from infection. It will also enable services to match the capacity for radiotherapy to patient needs if services become limited because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

This guidance was first published on 28 March 2020.

NICE has also produced a COVID-19 rapid guideline on delivery of systemic anticancer treatments.

This guideline is for:

  • health and care practitioners
  • health and care staff involved in planning and delivering services
  • commissioners

The recommendations bring together

  • existing national and international guidance and policies
  • advice from specialists working in the NHS from across the UK. These include people with expertise and experience of treating patients for the specific health conditions covered by the guidance during the current COVID-19 pandemic.

Full details from NICE